Upon Intrepid Madness

rainbow-femme:

I’m sick of magical worlds with no technology. I want fairy run coffee shops where you can get a latte with a shot of charisma, because you’ve got a big presentation you’re worried about, or witches working at Apple selling phones that automatically appear in your pocket if you accidentally leave it somewhere, or psychics running hair salons who always know how you want your hair to look, or aura reader therapists. I just really want normalized magic in modern society

petermorwood:

lmangueart:

thejunglenook:

scienceyoucanlove:

As a 19-year-old sophomore at Stanford, Elizabeth Holmes decided to transform diagnostic medicine so she dropped out of college and used her tuition money to start her own company, Theranos. Ten years later, Holmes, pictured here holding a micro-vial, is on the cutting edge of medical technology — her new blood testing method allows hundreds of tests to be run using only a few drops of blood. And, Holmes’ methods are cheaper, faster, more accurate, and less invasive than conventional methods which often require a separate vial of blood for every test.As Holmes told Wired.com earlier this year, “I started this company because I wanted to spend my life changing our health care system. When someone you love gets really sick, most of the time when you find out, it’s too late to be able to do something about it. It’s heartbreaking… We wanted to make actionable health information accessible to people everywhere at the time it matters most. That means two things: being able to detect conditions in time to do something about them and providing access to information that can empower people to improve their lives.”
read more from A Mighty Girl

Reasons you should adore Elizabeth Holmes:
She is featured as Forbes’ youngest self-made woman billionaire.
Her tests will revolutionize the public health world as we know it; Making diagnostic testing accessible and affordable for more people (and potentially saving Medicare and Medicaid ~$100 billion each over the next decade). (x)
She is a coauthor on 82 US and 189 foreign patent applications. (x)
Her fear of needles served as a motivator for launching Theranos. (x)

Fantastic! <3

“Her fear of needles served as a motivator for launching Theranos…" 
I bet it’s not so much the fear of needles (Aichmophobia) as the fear of being jabbed with them (Trypanophobia) - something that makes me twitch even when done in a movie. As for the real thing done to me…
No. Just no.

petermorwood:

lmangueart:

thejunglenook:

scienceyoucanlove:

As a 19-year-old sophomore at Stanford, Elizabeth Holmes decided to transform diagnostic medicine so she dropped out of college and used her tuition money to start her own company, Theranos. Ten years later, Holmes, pictured here holding a micro-vial, is on the cutting edge of medical technology — her new blood testing method allows hundreds of tests to be run using only a few drops of blood. And, Holmes’ methods are cheaper, faster, more accurate, and less invasive than conventional methods which often require a separate vial of blood for every test.

As Holmes told Wired.com earlier this year, “I started this company because I wanted to spend my life changing our health care system. When someone you love gets really sick, most of the time when you find out, it’s too late to be able to do something about it. It’s heartbreaking… We wanted to make actionable health information accessible to people everywhere at the time it matters most. That means two things: being able to detect conditions in time to do something about them and providing access to information that can empower people to improve their lives.”

read more from A Mighty Girl

Reasons you should adore Elizabeth Holmes:

  • She is featured as Forbes’ youngest self-made woman billionaire.
  • Her tests will revolutionize the public health world as we know it; Making diagnostic testing accessible and affordable for more people (and potentially saving Medicare and Medicaid ~$100 billion each over the next decade). (x)
  • She is a coauthor on 82 US and 189 foreign patent applications. (x)
  • Her fear of needles served as a motivator for launching Theranos. (x)

Fantastic! <3

Her fear of needles served as a motivator for launching Theranos…"

I bet it’s not so much the fear of needles (Aichmophobia) as the fear of being jabbed with them (Trypanophobia) - something that makes me twitch even when done in a movie. As for the real thing done to me…

No. Just no.

wow-lovelylovely:

imperfectlyperfectme0010:

fog-of-lost-souls:

I THOUGHT THIS WAS GONNA BE BUBBLES OR A DANDELION OR SOMETHING

Ohhhh my gooddddnnnesss yasssss!!!

I thought it was the cow thing, GOTTA REBLOG

wow-lovelylovely:

imperfectlyperfectme0010:

fog-of-lost-souls:

I THOUGHT THIS WAS GONNA BE BUBBLES OR A DANDELION OR SOMETHING

Ohhhh my gooddddnnnesss yasssss!!!

I thought it was the cow thing, GOTTA REBLOG

mikemcspooky:

ENLIST TODAY!

mikemcspooky:

ENLIST TODAY!

lordmoldywart:

I’LL REBLOG THIS TILL I DIE

lordmoldywart:

I’LL REBLOG THIS TILL I DIE

loki-has-a-tardis:

This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

loki-has-a-tardis:

This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

501rst:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

This is wonderful

vintagegal:

Backstage at the 1954 Pierre Balmain Couture show. Photos by Mark Shaw.

taylorswift:

lovestoryremix:

areweoutofthewoods-swift:

taylorswiftordie13:

something-about-taylor:

dats hawt

Ur hot. Keep being hot.

EUHIUGRHIRGHEHIOGJHIBHF taylorswift

she must have seen a fella over there…

Orrrrrr some teenage girls in the crowd wearing home-made Junior Jewels t-shirts…

(it’s ok Taylor, we all know it was someone walking over with delicious culinary items. No need to hide from the truth. Good food/baked goods= everything)

laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.
Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…
Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.
Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this image.

laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.

Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…

Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.

Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this image.